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World's Rarest Gems In Los Angeles Are On View Until April 21, 2024

"100 Carats: Icons of the Gem World" will be on exhibit at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County in Exposition Park on April 21, 2024, to allow visitors to view the world's rarest gems in Los Angeles.

Jan 12, 20241.6K Shares78K ViewsWritten By: Johnny K.Reviewed By: Luke Williams
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World's Rarest Gems In Los Angeles Are On View Until April 21, 2024

An upcoming exhibition at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County will provide rockhounds with a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to view extraordinary gems and gemstones.

"100 Carats: Icons of the Gem World" will be on exhibit at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County in Exposition Park on April 21, 2024, to allow visitors to view the world's rarest gems in Los Angeles.

World's Rarest Gems In Los Angeles

Jonker diamond
Jonker diamond

1934 was a momentous occasion in the history of the renowned Jonker diamond, during which time the transportation of precious stones was regarded as an informal affair. Unbelievably, this enormous 726-carat emerald, the fourth largest of its kind ever discovered, was shipped from South Africa to London via standard parcel service.

At first misidentified as glass by its discoverer, diamond miner Johannes Jacobus Jonker, the stone ultimately came into the possession of the Diamond Corporation. The corporation dutifully entrusted De Beers in London with the stone via the postal system.

The Jonker diamond, which arrived intact by a miraculous means, generated considerable interest as rumors circulated regarding its possible acquisition by King George V and Queen Mary. Harry Winston, the American "King of Diamonds," purchased the million-dollar gem and mailed it to New York for a paltry 65 cents in postage, thus defying expectations.

The Jonker diamond, which Winston refashioned into thirteen exquisite stones, entered imperial collections; Jonker 1, the largest at 125 carats, was bequeathed by Queen Ratna of Nepal to King Farouk of Egypt. This historic jewel has been rediscovered as part of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County's "100 Carats: Icons of the Gem World" exhibition, following years of obscurity.

Not only does the hypnotic Jonker 1 stand out for its immensity but also among twenty-five other monumental precious stones, some of which are even twice its mass, in the vault of the museum.

Natural marvels are on display at the exhibition, which is curated by Dr. Aaron Celestian and Robert Procop of Exceptional Jewels. Among these is the Crown of Colombia, the most massive emerald ever discovered in Colombia, with a remarkable weight of 241.04 carats

The purpose of the exhibition is to reveal natural color examples in jewels greater than 100 carats, many of which have been unseen for generations. The assortment showcases the extraordinary splendor and variety discovered in the depths of the Earth and includes specimens as large as the most magnificent electrifying blue Paraiba ever displayed.

Notwithstanding the scientific rationales underlying the hues and configurations, the exhibition evokes a sense of enchantment and mystical awe in its attendees. The exhibit enthralls with its diverse array of hues and forms, including gems that alter their hue in an enigmatic manner, such as The Miracle sapphire, which was formed beneath the earth billions of years ago.

The showcase shows the distinctiveness of gems such as the Great White, an azure gemstone devoid of any green undertones, and the Scepter, the largest bi-colored sapphire ever exhibited at 127.30 carats. By doing so, it underscores the importance of conserving the Earth's natural marvels.

Robert Procop, co-curator of the "100 Carats: Icons of the Gem World" exhibition, expresses concern over the nonexistence of a 100-carat or greater ruby of exceptional quality, speculating, "It may not exist." However, the pursuit of these invaluable artifacts persists, demonstrating the perpetual allure of precious stones that have captivated mankind for more than four millennia.

Until April 21, 2024, the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County will host an exhibition that entices visitors to delve into the enduring allure, enigma, and romance of the most magnificent jewels in the world.

Final Thoughts

The "100 Carats: Icons of the Gem World" exhibition at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County is a testament to the enduring allure of precious stones. From the historic journey of the Jonker diamond, once casually mailed for a mere 65 cents, to the breathtaking array of monumental gems on display, the exhibition encapsulates the romance, mystery, and fascination that have captivated humanity for millennia.

The gems on display serve as icons, not only of beauty but also as ambassadors for the need to protect and appreciate the extraordinary treasures found on Earth. With the exhibition running until April 21, 2024, there is ample time for enthusiasts to immerse themselves in the magical world of gems that continues to captivate and inspire.

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