At the jeweler's bench: Setting diamonds with French-cut pave

In this post, we will visit our custom jeweler's bench where he has been working on a special ring that employs the French-cut pavé method of setting diamonds. The goal of this setting technique is to see as little of the metal as possible and to create the illusion that the ring is made entirely of diamonds. To do this the jeweler cuts small "V" shapes into the metal for setting the stones.  This is different from the more common bead-set pavé, which in addition to using small beads of metal for setting the diamonds also incorporates side rails that feature milgrain details. (Think Edwardian jewelry.)

This series of pictures begins with the ring "blank" and follows the jeweler's progress, taking it from rough to refined.

A "blank" is like a rough draft of the ring, needing refinement as well as stones.

A "blank" is like a rough draft of the ring, needing refinement as well as stones.

The ring in setter's shellac and the triangles being cut into the sides.

The ring in setter's shellac and the triangles being cut into the sides.

 The bright cuts are all finished.

 The bright cuts are all finished.

The inside of the ring all polished prior to setting.

The inside of the ring all polished prior to setting.

The top triangles are split into a "V" shape and formed to hold the diamonds down.

The top triangles are split into a "V" shape and formed to hold the diamonds down.

The finished French-cut pavé ring!

The finished French-cut pavé ring!